Category: crafts and such



There have been 1000 blog posts, and Oldentimes recently hit 200 followers! Thank you so much for hanging around to see what Oldentimes has to say!
In honor of what to me is a wonder, I am going to give something away…

hand embroidered pillowcase set

hand embroidered pillowcase set

or
quilted cupcake pot holder

quilted cupcake pot holder


So if you want to leave a comment here, telling which you would like to have, a drawing will be held on March 10 and two winners will be selected. One person will recieve the pillowcases and the other the potholder.
This is my small thank you.


For the backstory, please go here: https://oldentimes.wordpress.com/2011/06/25/flour-sack-feed-sack-treasure/

Since that post was written, I have discovered some ‘history’ regarding some of the quilting treasure. Part of it belonged to the great-great-great grandmother of a young girl who attends my church.
At the request of this young ladies great-great grandmother, I have made a collage of some of the ‘treasure’ to present her and written the accompanying letter:
Dear Morgan,

Right now, perhaps, you are too young to understand this treasure.
Years ago, ladies made quilts to keep their families warm. People could not go to the store and buy things, like we do now, so every scrap was used for something.
In winter, when things were slow and there was not so much work to do, quilts were made. Often this had to be done at night after the rest of the family was in bed, using a coal oil lamp for light. It was very hard work.
In this frame is a quilt block, in the pattern called Dresden plate. This one is made with old feed sack fabric, some of what is called ‘shirting’, possibly dress fabric and cotton broadcloth.
The pattern pieces with it were cut from cardboard.
They would be traced on the fabric, then it was cut out in shapes and sewed together by hand to make blocks.
These would finally be sewed to make a quilt top, layered with a batting and back and stitched together to make a warm quilt.
The strips are for a quilt called ‘Double Wedding Ring’, quite often made years ago by a mother, aunt or grandmother as a wedding gift for a bride and groom. A treasure for all their lives.
This one seems to have pieces cut from clothing, possibly that of the bride or groom’s family. I left one upside down so the hand stitching would show.
Now I know, you are asking, why is this a treasure for me?
This Dresden Plate block and the pieces for the Double Wedding Ring were made by your great-great-great- grandmother. The fabric is old and valued in quilt making today, a rare and wonderful find.
I received it as a gift and now I am giving it back to you.


monkeying around 003
Crochet circles and bigger circles and change colors for more circles… 15 circles and a little finish work and you have a hat!


Today, four friends gathered to make quilt ‘tops’.
One of the group had already made one so helped us with the new ‘tools’ and ‘techniques’ needed to turn fabric and ‘thread’ into something beautiful and when finished, will no doubt keep someone ‘toasty’ warm.
Information on making our tops can be found here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWOS9KBDJgU
Here is one of my blocks, called Rapid Fire Hunter’s Star.
hunter star 001


Today I sent a selection of knitting needles, collected over the years to a young lady who grew up with my youngest daughter.

I learned to knit, along with a class of other girls when I was 9 or 10, while growing up in Nebraska. My interest lasted about as long as it took to make a hat and scarf, sadly, I did not keep it up, and somewhere along the way that set of needles went the way of many other childhood toys… I am sure my parents gave them to someone who would use them.

About 20 years later, I took it up again, my skills improved and so did my desire to make things. Scarves, hats, and a few baby afghans began to appear. With those increased abilities came the need for more needles, different lengths and sizes and a collection was born.

Over the years, I have purchased some, some came as gifts, one group of needles came while we lived in New Hampshire. Walking down the street , we came upon a home being emptied after a death in the family. There in the bin for trash was a large collection of knitting supplies. The family was happy to ‘donate’ them to another knitter, rather than the local land-fill and I was pleased with the acquisition, too.

Sweaters and slippers were soon added to my repertoire as my stack of patterns grew and I met another knitter there who taught me much and encouraged me.

We moved back to Missouri and so, the needles migrated with us. As the annual Christmases, birthday parties and baby gifts came around with knit gifts, I acquired some more ‘legacy’ needles from one of my sister-in-laws when her mother passed away.

I took an inventory and had them from size 0 to 13, long, short, some double point and some circular. Quite a collection, and truly well-loved.

Then I went to visit my daughter in California and discovered bamboo needles.  Over time all the metal and plastic ones were replaced with bamboo.

What to do with all these needless needles?  When I discovered that this long time friend was knitting, I offered her the needles and she accepted. She has promised to teach someone, hopefully a future daughter in law and pass along to at least a fourth generation some needles with a story.

I hope that happens!


This first day of the year brought along gloomy skies and some showers of sleet. And the gloom has hung on, despite the weatherman promising some sun this afternoon.

For the most part, I have stayed inside, keeping Hubby, Miss Lily and my comfy chair entertained. Snuggling up there with a quilt and alternately reading and knitting just seemed like a good way to spend my time.

I made some heavy inroads in a couple of books, finished one knitting project and started another.

However, no matter what, it seems that food preparation and consumption always has to interrupt my projects.

New Years Day tradition ‘requires’ black-eyed peas in my part of the world, and with them came some ham and scalloped potatoes. A pretty simple and straightforward meal, and it isn’t that hard to put together.

While standing in the kitchen, doing dishes, I got to watch two spectacular woodpeckers doing what looked like some sort of ritual dance around branches in the maple tree. I know they were just hunting food, but the rhythm and grace of their movements was a treat. Not to mention the bright red and black plumage, such a lovely note of color on an otherwise grey day.

So there is my color provided to cheer my spirits as did the blues of the scarf I was working on.

1/1/13 scarf knitting


Cheryl Baranski of Virginia is the winner of the Jam.

Today, the skies are gray and gloomy. It’s 50 degrees and looks like it might rain. The weather forecasters are saying we might have some snowflakes in the next few days.

Black-capped chickadees have been hanging around. My mother-in-law always called them ‘snow birds’ and believed that if they came in numbers there would be snow.

Most of my Christmas crafting is finished, the last stocking was done this morning, one scarf to go and a couple of hats. Then unless something strikes my fancy, the yarn, knitting needles and crochet hooks can rest awhile. But as always, this time of year, I picked up some pretty yarn to add to the big basket by my chair.

And I printed some patterns I want to ‘try’, so I doubt they will be out of business for a while yet. Surely someone will ‘need’ a scarf, hat, mittens or such in the future.

Earlier this week, I did some bartering, I traded some of my jellies for some of different flavors with a neighbor, then a couple of jars for a series of books from an author friend, and some books for some handmade gifts with yet another friend.

Each of us came away happy, feeling we had gained something we wanted on the trade.

Things like that are sort of like a big hug, don’t you think?


This really cute little Christmas stocking pattern for crochet can be found here: http://jeanariespatterns.blogspot.com/

It makes up in a hurry, even my Arthritic fingers got it done in a couple of hours. I have a basket of ‘scrap’ yarn from various projects and it doesn’t take a lot to make these.

I am working on the fourth one now.

Now I am off to make a couple more. There are some grand and great-grands who might just ‘need’ them!


This has nothing to do with writing, the pen mentioned here is a pen for the feeder hogs, Hubby and Grandson built an adequate one before the pigs came to live with us. However since the pigs multiplied at the auction from the two we had planned on to five…

Fortunately, we found some other buyers for two of the extra ones and that made building a loading chute from the pen a necessity. Hubby has been working on this for a couple of days. Today I was drafted to assist with making the loading gate and getting it hung.

Since my body rejects lifting and twisting, necessary things in the project I was handed a level, tape measure and carpenters pencil. I knew that if anything did not fit, I was going to hear about it! I am pretty sure I have mentioned that Hubby and I are not exactly blessed with silver hammers when it comes to lumber construction.

Things fit, I figured out the proper placement of hinges and was there to hand screws and nails as needed. Happily at 4 PM, we were able to say the days project was complete.

When the buyers show up, we will be able to load the pigs!


I love the Irish Chain pattern and this color combination of purples and greens.