Category: friends and family



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Wednesday, August 31: Hubby has checked and rechecked the weather and water stage for out favorite spot on the Mississippi River. It’s all clear and clear that we need to make a trip!  We have a place on private property neat the Dorena -Hickman Ferry we really enjoy.

Most of the day was spent loading the camper, we managed to leave about 5 PM, well aware we would arrive after dark.

One stop for gas and a few groceries and one farther down the road at Love’s truck stop in Sikeston for fried chicken (dinner) and Dunkin Donuts got us to our destination about 8:30 PM. Not a problem this trip, since we have the camper and do not have to put up a tent in the dark.

When we pulled up near the ferry landing, a large van was sitting at the ferry loading ramp.  A uniformed man got out and came over to the truck. He showed us his badge and credentials and asked “When will the ferry run?” Taking a few moments to explain he was driving a Federal Prison Transport and GPS had brought him there as the shortest route to his destination.

Sadly, we had to explain that the ferry would not be there until around 7 AM and gave him directions to the nearest bridge.

We pulled into ‘our’ spot, did some quick unloading and went to bed.

Rising early, we set up the outdoor cooking area, canopy and got things organized for our weekend. A few minutes after 7, as we are enjoying a cup of coffee and Hubby prepares to go fishing, the ferry pulls in to let off the first passengers of the day.  As usual, they blast off the horn to let those waiting know they have arrived.

We hear the loudspeaker, Capt. Jeremy and the deck hand greet us with a hearty hello and the question “What’s for breakfast?” Prompted, no doubt, by the fact that usually we send food down to the boat. They often send us some oft he Asian Carp the land on the boat to use for bait.

Egg sandwiches were delivered to the crew on their next run.

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Much has been said over the past week about playing the ‘woman card’.

Today’s news showed us the one ostensibly carried by a political candidate. I found it to be lacking, but that is just my humble opinion.

A friend mentioned we all could use one, listing some of the attributes we feel make us who we are. After all, we are lifetime members of the unique guild.

And then, why not a ‘Man Card’ for the rest of the world? Let’s not be guilty of bigotry, all lives matter!

I present mine here: One of my photos and a few words, quite simple.

the woman card

What would your card say?


It might be a good idea to read this past post before you begin the one  for today.

https://oldentimes.wordpress.com/2010/11/19/adventures-with-betty-crocker/

This sort of sets the stage.

Over the years, many young cooks have passed through the kitchen on Sunrise ridge and other places we have called ‘home’ in our journey through life.

Betty Crocker’s red cookbooks for making things and a set of Good measuring cups have been staples of the experience.

This past week, a photo on Facebook of the big red ‘pic cover cookbook was making the rounds. Of course I shared it and many comments came, a good number from those who shared in the making of thing from that book.

My old copy is held together with duct tape, notes in the margins, and many pages smeared with drips. I have a child who wants it and her daughter is now beginning to cook, sometimes here in Sunrise kitchen. Another generation to share with.

While at an auction yesterday, another copy of the book was for sale. The cover was a little worn, the pages inside much like mine.

Yes, I  felt the need to purchase it. Another daughter and granddaughter live in California and they too should have this book.

Now, I need to find a couple more copies for some of the others who ‘graduated’ with the basic cooking certificate here.

I see they are available on Amazon and other outlets, some for quite a price. The ones I need though are well loved, used, smeared (especially on the page with the fudge recipe) and have notes written in them. They may not bee my notes, but I will happily transcribe from mine.

Not much of a ‘legacy’ you might think, but you are wrong. These books are filled with memories and love!

 

 


Fifty years ago, March 26, 1966, Hubby and I eloped. March 27 is his birthday, so those two days are set aside on our calendar as the anni-birthary.  Where did the time go? What happened to that young soldier about to be shipped out for duty and the girl who had made her first plane flight to join him?

Many things happened, and it all went by in a rush it seems. Good times, bad, joy and sorrow.

That being said, yesterday we had a quiet celebration. Present were many immediate family members,  four generations, counting us.

We provided a place for  festivities and a meal which the older girls brought, Ham potatoes, salads and desserts. I made, with a little help from two of the greats, some hot rolls for the meal.

Chore volunteers from the pack of kids were sorted simply by announcing what needed to be done, most of them were quickly taken care of without even saying a name! The few that were not were rapidly done by the designated teenager!

Easter falls during the event this years so about 200 eggs, mostly plastic, were also necessary. Egg decorating was supervised and directed, and older grandsons took care of scattering and hiding them for the younger participants.

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Pictured: grands and greats, gathered for the egg hunt.

 

 

 

 


A friend of mine, Verna Moss, posted a picture of a pin cushion on Facebook. I made a comment about it and was treated to this wonderful story. I asked permission to share it, and graciously, my friend has allowed me to share the picture and the lovely tale.

verna's grandmother

My grandma, Hannah Burton-Hall-Warren, my dad’s mother, made this pin cushion when she was 90 years old and totally blind. You can tell by the long, running stitches that she had to do this by feel and what she could “see” in her mind. She made many projects such as stuffed dolls, aprons, and pin cushions without assistance other than she would have us to match up fabric, lace, and thread, etc. We would put a safety pin on the “right” side of the fabric so it wouldn’t be wrong side up.
Grandma was born with limited vision – she could read by holding a book up close or using a magnifying glass. She had a cornea transplant in her 60’s but it failed and she was then totally blind for the remainder of her life. Because of her poor vision, they didn’t send her to school; but, she outsmarted them by teaching herself how to get by in life. For the most part, she raised 3 children by herself – her husband, Marian Burton, had TB and died at an early age. Grandma took in laundry; ironed clothes; raised big gardens and canned; she raised, butchered and sold chickens and eggs. . She did whatever she could to feed and clothe her family – she didn’t live on welfare or handouts – she worked hard to survive. Grandma was very independent and came up with many creative techniques for everyday life. To prevent overfilling a cup, she would put her thumb inside the rim to judge how full the cup was; when writing letters or shopping lists, she would put a rubber band around a stenographer notebook to determine where to place the ink pen and then roll the rubber band down the paper to prevent writing on top of each line. She would have us sort her money out and then she would fold each bill a different way according to its denomination – she always knew exactly how much money she had. To sweep, she would sit in the floor with an old rag and a dust pan and “sweep” the dirt into the dust pan. She died at the age of 97. She never considered herself old, in her late 80’s, she would still say, “When I get old …” She was quite a lady!! I wish her great-great grandkids would have had an opportunity to know her; she was a master at storytelling and loved nothing more than spending time with children. After my mother died in 1955, both of my grandmothers, Grandma Hall and Grandma Angel, helped Daddy to care for us. Grandma Hall came to the “old store” and helped Daddy care for us and the store until he remarried in 1956.

Grandparents are such a treasure!


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Recently, I attended a Heritage Event at Alley Spring in the Ozark National Scenic Riverways.

One of the exhibit demonstrations was Wagon Wheel Rug Weaving, which greatly intrigued me.

The lady weaving gave some information about how it was done, and I thought since I have lots of fabric scraps from quilt making that I should really try this.

When I got home, I looked on the internet and found some further instructions.

The first and foremost item of importance is a hoop big enough for the project. I did not have one so made a prototype on an embroidery hoop. (We are not going to discuss that here, other than to say it gave me a lot of feed back on what NOT to do).

A couple of days later, a friend came over to learn how to do this and gifted me an old hula hoop. Much better! I gave her a copy of my instructions, a sort of lesson and she has her rug completed as well.

The following pictures give an idea of this weaving technique. Adding the wheel ‘spokes’ as you go is rather challenging . Probably comparable to basket weaving. I might try that one of these days…

It took two old sheets, an assortment of scraps, about 12 hours of actual ‘work’ to complete a 34 inch rug..

Hubby remarked “It looks like a rug.” Very astute, or as a friend says, depend on a man to tell you the truth.

Not perfect, but I now know a lot more about the ‘how to’ and am looking forward to beginning another one before long.

Winter is coming and crafting is a good way to while away cold weather. And while I do it, I will have this little rug to rest my feet on!

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October 18, ready to add more ‘spokes’

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October 22, progress!

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October 28 Finished project. Still needs some trimming


Halloween, long ago.

The ‘pack’ of neighborhood kids, dressed in homemade costumes, parading down the streets.

Those kids, waiting for the homemade cookies, caramel apples, real apples, popcorn balls, an occasional candy bar or block of Double Bubble gum.

Laughter, skinned knees, carrying your fussy toddler sibling the last couple of blocks.

No vandals, no chunked pumpkins, no worries, no fears.

What happened?


Yesterday, my sister and I went down some old dirt roads together.

One stop took me back some 50+ years, as we found and photographed a house much like my in-laws when Hubby and I first wed. That house had no electricity, no water running from a tap. It held respect, knowledge and caring people, for which I am forever grateful.

out withBJ for the day 027pro.

All this picture needs is me and Granny,sitting on the porch, enjoying the summer afternoon. Feeling the breeze, listening to cicadas and birds sing, a glass of cold well water in hand. Knowing a ‘canning’ of green beans, one of tomatoes, and a batch of pickles are sealing in the kitchen. The wood stove is cooling down, dishes done up, floor is swept…nothing to do for an hour or two, until supper. At peace with the world.


It has been a long week on Sunrise Ridge. Epic cold and snow deep and fluffy has kept me inside for the most part.

Oh, there has been plenty to ‘do’, but at some point cabin fever sets in.

Then there was, picking at the back of my mind this coming Monday,  Chrysta’s birthday.  Yesterday, while prepping for more unpleasant weather, I had an idea. That idea led to posting this request on social media:

‘Throwing this out there. In November, daughter Chrysta passed away. She was a loving caring woman, filled with compassion.
Monday would be her birthday.
In her memory, I challenge all of my friends to ‘pay it forward’.
Do a random act of kindness for someone this weekend.
Feel free to share your blessings.’

Grandson Brett and I are making cookies for him to share at the Sheltered Workshop where he is employed.

Someone is donating blood, another made soup and shared with a neighbor… many great ideas.

I know Monday still looms in the future, no doubt there will be tears, but the idea that we are celebrating a life well lived doing things she would do is comforting.

Feel free to join this birthday party and share your blessings with someone and in a comment here.


A friend asked earlier, about a ‘perfect’ romantic getaway. No doubt prompted by Valentine’s Day arriving thiswee.

Hers was a weekend at a B&B,  A fine dinner, a movie and there is certainly nothing wrong with that idea. In fact, I would bet that her choice is probably a lot more popular than mine. 🙂

So here it is, ‘Mary’s Truly Romantic Weekend’. Hubby and I would load up our camping gear and head for a ‘special place’ we like. Warm sunshine, soft sand, clear clean blue water would nearly surround us. Gentle breezes wafting floral scents, a soft serenade of birdsong… Not a cellphone or electronic item in sight

A long walk or two, time to talk. Hubby might fish…. I can read a book or nap!

Velvet nights under the stars, maybe a splinter of moon for light, a campfire for a bit of warmth and hand holding before we go to bed. Simple food, bacon and eggs in the cast iron skillet for breakfast, pork steak and baked potatoes on the grill and some fruit for dessert.

How about you? What is your dream romantic getaway?