Category: legacy



When our daughter passed away, in 2014, all her craft and quilting supplies were put away. This summer, in an effort to scale down some of the fabric stash and clutter in my craft area, I came upon the boxes and bags filled with her work.

Yes, I grieved again, while trying to decide what should be done with all this. Embroidery, crewel work and quilt blocks. Part of them went into a box to be passed on. I do not do embroidery or crewel work and never will. A disabled friend of a friend does and I know it will be appreciated there.

The quilt blocks and fabric remained, staring at me every time I went in the room. Finally, inspiration struck. I got out some of the blocks and started quilts for each of her three grand children.

I truly worked long and thought hard, since the children are three, four and six years old. Will they understand and cherish them? I do hope so.

But there were other blocks left, a small wall-hanging or lap quilt for each sister? Yes. Those are  in the works. And one for each of her two sons ‘on the drawing board’.

It hurts some to think of trips to buy fabric and all the fun we had in the planning, knowing she never got to see the fruit of this lavor. There are more than a few teardrops on some of the blocks.

Ir’s hard work, but it is bringing me comfort, as I hope it will to the recipients.


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Dear Morgan,

This frame holds some of your history.

I will tell you what I can, the quilt blocks were pieced by your great-great-great-grandmother.

She used those cardboard cutouts to make the smaller pieces to sew together by hand as you can see from the one I left upside down. those pieces and the cutout are from a pattern called double wedding ring.

The full block and its pieces are called Dresden Plate.

You might notice your great-great- great grandfather’s name and address on the pattern pieces I included.

The fabric in the back was from her ‘fabric stash’ as quilters call the fabrics saved or purchased for making their treasures.

The red flowers is from an old feed sack, the way many ladies got their fabric. Often they would make a child a dress or shirt and then use the remainder for quilts.

I came by this from someone who had purchased it at an auction and passed it to me. I saved some of the old fabric and blocks, because they are treasures.

Your Great-great grandmother, Bettie, told me they were made by her mother-in-law and asked if I would fix some for you. So here it is, I do hope that you will find it a ‘treasure’ and as you grow up something you will always love.

Mary Shipman