Category: simple things



Here, on Sunrise Ridge, in order to coax small children to eat, I have resorted to  drawing ‘Happy faces’ on the paper plates -after they finish their meal.

After dinner last night, I mentioned that we would have French toast for breakfast, that was met with a lot of enthusiasm.

This morning, I make the French toast and fix the plates, great-grand Sarah takes about two bites of her breakfast and says, “I am done.”

That’s fine, drink your juice, put your fork in the sink…

And she remembered the cookies we had baked during yesterday’s ‘Snow Day’!

“Can I have a cookie now?”

Well, no, because if you are not hungry enough to eat your French toast, you are not hungry enough to have cookies.

Her plate was clean and ready for a big smile in no time flat!

Advertisements

Many years ago, Hubby, two daughters and I lived on Tom’s Creek Road, in rural Reynolds County Missouri.

The road wound and twisted through a small valley, passing a few homes and small farms. Tom’s Creek itself, roamed across fields, along the roadside, looping and singing as it wended along.

Driving the road at night, one would often find a deer or several grazing along the roadside edge or a passing fox or coyote racing across the open space.

The year we lived there, the kids often played in the 6 – 8 inches of water that slipped over rocks near our house. Once or twice rainstorms raised the flow to the top of the 2 foot bank separating our little cabin from the then rushing flow.

Winter brought a couple of ice storms that made leaving impossible without 4 wheel drive; there was no other way to get over the hills at either end of the road.

Fast forward now, Forty-five years or so…

This past weekend, I traveled another Tom’s Creek Road. This one in West Virginia and due to a malfunction with GPS.

In the dark hours of early morning, the unit directed a left turn onto Tom’s Creek Road. Grandson, Randy, my driver and I mentioned how odd/funny/interesting that was. You know, ‘here we drive 800 miles only to find ourselves right back home.’

This one came off a small mountain, filled with several sharp curves and many many deer congregated quite often in the middle of those curves. I did not actually see the creek in the darkness, assuming it was somewhere below the steep edge of the road hugging the mountain side.

There is another local road that fits the West Virginia Tom’s Creek Road, more than its namesake here.

Finally we reached the bottom and a small town near our destination. When we left, we went out the same way, finding that during daylight it was not quite so exciting, merely very picturesque and pleasant.

.


October 1, 2016, also known as National Cookie Day.

My fine helpers made Oatmeal Raisin and Snickerdoodle cookies.

“C” was the letter of the week at Pre-K and we talked about cooking, cookies, chef hats and co-operation while we worked out way through the project.

Grampa and Daddy were working on our truck. We fixed a plate with cookies to take to them, complete with a pack of wipes so they could clean their hands.!

A good time was had by all


Recently, our family has expanded a bit. Single parent grandson and his children have been staying with us, while he does some serious re-hab on their house.

Having a Head Start student and a Pre-K student around is a challenge. We have had an assortment of the older ones in and out over the years, but no ‘little ones’ on a regular basis.

Of course we are handling it, pretty well. As Hubby says, “We can do this one more time.”

Last week our Pre-K boy needed something that started with the letter N for his ‘Show and Tell’. Uncle Brett and I helped and we soon had lovely noodle necklaces for him to take. 100_0533

I’m re you can see that the finished project made him happy, and he said  everyone in his class liked it too.

While we worked on them, I realized that I did these with my siblings, my own kids, grandkids, various nieces and nephews, and a host of the other children that filtered through out home over the years.

That’s a lot of pasta!


100_0462

Wednesday, August 31: Hubby has checked and rechecked the weather and water stage for out favorite spot on the Mississippi River. It’s all clear and clear that we need to make a trip!  We have a place on private property neat the Dorena -Hickman Ferry we really enjoy.

Most of the day was spent loading the camper, we managed to leave about 5 PM, well aware we would arrive after dark.

One stop for gas and a few groceries and one farther down the road at Love’s truck stop in Sikeston for fried chicken (dinner) and Dunkin Donuts got us to our destination about 8:30 PM. Not a problem this trip, since we have the camper and do not have to put up a tent in the dark.

When we pulled up near the ferry landing, a large van was sitting at the ferry loading ramp.  A uniformed man got out and came over to the truck. He showed us his badge and credentials and asked “When will the ferry run?” Taking a few moments to explain he was driving a Federal Prison Transport and GPS had brought him there as the shortest route to his destination.

Sadly, we had to explain that the ferry would not be there until around 7 AM and gave him directions to the nearest bridge.

We pulled into ‘our’ spot, did some quick unloading and went to bed.

Rising early, we set up the outdoor cooking area, canopy and got things organized for our weekend. A few minutes after 7, as we are enjoying a cup of coffee and Hubby prepares to go fishing, the ferry pulls in to let off the first passengers of the day.  As usual, they blast off the horn to let those waiting know they have arrived.

We hear the loudspeaker, Capt. Jeremy and the deck hand greet us with a hearty hello and the question “What’s for breakfast?” Prompted, no doubt, by the fact that usually we send food down to the boat. They often send us some oft he Asian Carp the land on the boat to use for bait.

Egg sandwiches were delivered to the crew on their next run.


When our daughter passed away, in 2014, all her craft and quilting supplies were put away. This summer, in an effort to scale down some of the fabric stash and clutter in my craft area, I came upon the boxes and bags filled with her work.

Yes, I grieved again, while trying to decide what should be done with all this. Embroidery, crewel work and quilt blocks. Part of them went into a box to be passed on. I do not do embroidery or crewel work and never will. A disabled friend of a friend does and I know it will be appreciated there.

The quilt blocks and fabric remained, staring at me every time I went in the room. Finally, inspiration struck. I got out some of the blocks and started quilts for each of her three grand children.

I truly worked long and thought hard, since the children are three, four and six years old. Will they understand and cherish them? I do hope so.

But there were other blocks left, a small wall-hanging or lap quilt for each sister? Yes. Those are  in the works. And one for each of her two sons ‘on the drawing board’.

It hurts some to think of trips to buy fabric and all the fun we had in the planning, knowing she never got to see the fruit of this lavor. There are more than a few teardrops on some of the blocks.

Ir’s hard work, but it is bringing me comfort, as I hope it will to the recipients.


This morning, Hubby and two grand-boys went off to an auction, leaving me home to  enjoy a day of laundry, cleaning and such with no interruptions.

They pulled in about 4:30, after I had all the animals taken care of for the day.

Hubby walks in, asks for a glass of tea, hands me the auction stubs and says, “I spent about a hundred dollars.”

I start looking through the ticket stubs, let out a yelp, grabbed my camera and ran to the truck!

100_0042

There it was, 100_0040a beauty and a treasure!

All the attachments, extra bobbins and needles. the key to the top drawer, an extra belt, spools of thread marked 18 cents and some cardboard quilt templates were found inside the drawers.

100_0041The boys have it in the sewing room, I have plans for it!

 

 

 

Years ago, I learned to sew on one of these, and I have a gang of kids, grand and great that should learn to use one too.

Maybe, down the road, someone else will be pleased to own this treasure!

 


Much has been said over the past week about playing the ‘woman card’.

Today’s news showed us the one ostensibly carried by a political candidate. I found it to be lacking, but that is just my humble opinion.

A friend mentioned we all could use one, listing some of the attributes we feel make us who we are. After all, we are lifetime members of the unique guild.

And then, why not a ‘Man Card’ for the rest of the world? Let’s not be guilty of bigotry, all lives matter!

I present mine here: One of my photos and a few words, quite simple.

the woman card

What would your card say?


It might be a good idea to read this past post before you begin the one  for today.

https://oldentimes.wordpress.com/2010/11/19/adventures-with-betty-crocker/

This sort of sets the stage.

Over the years, many young cooks have passed through the kitchen on Sunrise ridge and other places we have called ‘home’ in our journey through life.

Betty Crocker’s red cookbooks for making things and a set of Good measuring cups have been staples of the experience.

This past week, a photo on Facebook of the big red ‘pic cover cookbook was making the rounds. Of course I shared it and many comments came, a good number from those who shared in the making of thing from that book.

My old copy is held together with duct tape, notes in the margins, and many pages smeared with drips. I have a child who wants it and her daughter is now beginning to cook, sometimes here in Sunrise kitchen. Another generation to share with.

While at an auction yesterday, another copy of the book was for sale. The cover was a little worn, the pages inside much like mine.

Yes, I  felt the need to purchase it. Another daughter and granddaughter live in California and they too should have this book.

Now, I need to find a couple more copies for some of the others who ‘graduated’ with the basic cooking certificate here.

I see they are available on Amazon and other outlets, some for quite a price. The ones I need though are well loved, used, smeared (especially on the page with the fudge recipe) and have notes written in them. They may not bee my notes, but I will happily transcribe from mine.

Not much of a ‘legacy’ you might think, but you are wrong. These books are filled with memories and love!

 

 


Today is ‘Autism Awareness Day’.

At our house, like many others, that is every day, not once a year.

As I look back over the past two years since grandson, Brett, has been living with us full time, so many achievements have been made.

Just last week, Brett mentioned that he wants to invite some people over for a spaghetti dinner next Sunday.

This is, in fact several great milestones:

Brett is inviting people (coming out of his shell).

He wants to cook the entire meal himself ( building skills). Last year, for his birthday, a friend sent him a wonderful cookbook. Another sent an apron and chef hat. He uses both. One of his goals has been preparing complete meals for the three of us several times a week.

Last weekend, he made his ‘famous to us’ baked beans for the crowd assembled for out anniversary dinner.

http://www.amazon.com/Picture-Cook-See-Make-Eat/dp/1612432344  is the link for the cookbook.

He has his ‘list’ and a ‘time table’ made (life skills and independence)

And I know, he will do it, and do it well!