Tag Archive: cooking



It might be a good idea to read this past post before you begin the one  for today.

https://oldentimes.wordpress.com/2010/11/19/adventures-with-betty-crocker/

This sort of sets the stage.

Over the years, many young cooks have passed through the kitchen on Sunrise ridge and other places we have called ‘home’ in our journey through life.

Betty Crocker’s red cookbooks for making things and a set of Good measuring cups have been staples of the experience.

This past week, a photo on Facebook of the big red ‘pic cover cookbook was making the rounds. Of course I shared it and many comments came, a good number from those who shared in the making of thing from that book.

My old copy is held together with duct tape, notes in the margins, and many pages smeared with drips. I have a child who wants it and her daughter is now beginning to cook, sometimes here in Sunrise kitchen. Another generation to share with.

While at an auction yesterday, another copy of the book was for sale. The cover was a little worn, the pages inside much like mine.

Yes, I  felt the need to purchase it. Another daughter and granddaughter live in California and they too should have this book.

Now, I need to find a couple more copies for some of the others who ‘graduated’ with the basic cooking certificate here.

I see they are available on Amazon and other outlets, some for quite a price. The ones I need though are well loved, used, smeared (especially on the page with the fudge recipe) and have notes written in them. They may not bee my notes, but I will happily transcribe from mine.

Not much of a ‘legacy’ you might think, but you are wrong. These books are filled with memories and love!

 

 

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A new year has begun.

I thought would share a couple of photos that I particularly enjoyed from 2015.

 

eagles

taste testing


Hubby discovered he really likes some types of pickles. Likes them enough, in fact, that he has been learning his way around the hot water bath canner very well!

Today, he made bread and butter pickles and a batch of dilled okra.

You might wonder why he did that?

It is simple, I spent a few days in hospital and have not got back up to par… He had been great about helping slice veggies and pack jars.  The garden hasn’t slowed down one bit. Vegetables  just keep piling up!

Today’s abundance of cucumbers and okra had to be canned up, so he did it! I read the instructions, he made his brines and took right over.

He’s a good man, my pickle packing Papa!


Three gallons of green beans arrived in the kitchen on Sunrise Ridge.
I shanghaied one of he current resident teenagers this morning and demonstrated the fine art of tips, tails and snapping to a more or less willing apprentice. Before long, aid apprentice got the hang of things and we raced through the last half-gallon to see who was faster. 😉
The next part of the lesson involved jar and canner preparation.
While water was heating in the pressure canner, the assistant finished heating beans and getting them properly into the jars.
Soon we had 7 jars of beans in the canner and a respite of time while they cooked.
I regaled my young helper with tales of long ago July days when canning meant keeping the wood stove going, and how glad we were when another was procured and set outside under a big oak tree. There was still a wood fire to feed, but being out where there was a breeze sure beat doing it inside.
Now, I admit, I am pretty sure my helper still has no idea about the wood stove canning and I hope never as to learn how to do that particular thing.
We got the second canner load ready and all finished by 11:30.
That gave us plenty of time to fix dinner and prepare for the second lesson.
We did tomatoes this afternoon, and assistant was pleasantly surprised to find out by dipping the lovely red orbs in boiling water for a few minutes then into ice water, the skins slip right off.
So, now the pantry shelves are filling. A teenager has learned some new things and I have had a very good day. Yes, a very good day!


This week, it has been ‘just the two of us’ here on Sunrise Ridge. Digging through the freezer in search of inspiration, I came across a beef roast. o doubt, I purchased it a while back when there were more mouths to feed, but since we hadn’t had beef in a while, I decided to fix it.
Sunday, it had not thawed, so Hubby cut thin slices and fajitas were the dish of the day.
Monday, I put the roast in the slow cooker with veggies and after several hours it appeared with biscuits and grave as the centerpiece for dinner.
Today is Tuesday and roast beef sandwiches were tasty for lunch as well as roast beef hash for our dinner.
There is still a pretty good chunk of meat left for two people. I packaged it up for a return to the freezer, it will appear again when I feel a hankering for beef. I Wonder what guise it will have then?


Someone asked about the worst kitchen disaster you ever had.
I ran that through my brain and thought of this one: Several years ago, I was getting a ‘company’ meal ready. The dessert was to be a pineapple upside down cake. As I was removing the cake from the glass pan to cool, there was a knock at the door. Startled, I bumped the tray it was on and at the same time dropped the glass baking pan on the floor. It shattered, the cake went down right on top of the scattered shards of glass. Truly the worst disaster. Dinner was late, after the cleanup and I have no idea what I might have served for dessert that night.
The second worst, when I think of it, was one night when there was sleep over at our house. The girls decided to make fudge. You know how fudge is sometimes, this was one of those times. It did not set up. The girls poured it down the sink. You guessed it, it set up in the drain! Hubby spent much of the next day unclogging the pipe.


If you counted the presents for my birthday, or what was wrapped up under the tree, it looked pretty meager.
If you count the well wishes, cards and calls, the family time, the home made food and cake, it’s a whole different story!
Hubby kidnapped me one day last week for an adventure with the camera. Hiking through snow near Current River, watching wildlife and exploring old buildings. A picnic lunch and ‘time’ to rnjoy the world of winter together.
No, no one took me out to eat, son-in-law made lasagna and the grandkids made a cake.
birthday 006
Family time, visiting, playing checkers and mancala, sharing thoughts, ideas, laughter, plans and love.
No one got me anything fancy or expensive, but I was very pleased to get craft supplies that will be used and are a pay it forward. More than likely someone else will end up with the things that will be made from them.
I did not make a Christmas dinner, we gathered for a pot of chili on Christmas eve, and enjoyed a dinner made by our daughter and grand daughter on Christmas day.
I don’t need a lot of ‘things’ anymore. I can count my blessings, be grateful for what I have and be very content with it. I am blessed and life for us on Sunrise Ridge is good.


Yesterday, I mentioned that I was making chili because I was expecting a house full of company. There were some requests for the recipe, so here it is.
I cook up 4 cups of pinto beans, with no seasonings.
When the beans are tender and the broth still pretty thin, turn them off.
Fry 1 lb. hamburger meat and 1 cup chopped onion until meat is done and onions translucent.
Add to the beans along with a 28 oz. can of Rotel diced tomatoes with green chilis for mild chili or Rotel tomatoes with jalapenos for more kick, salt and chili powder to taste.
Add a cup of chunky salsa (optional).
Let that simmer slow until it is as thick as you like your chili.

If chili is too spicy for your taste topping with cheese helps to tone down the ‘bite’.
This made about a gallon of chili. Everyone except Hubby thought it was great, he thought it needed more chili powder. What does he know?


kids day at gramma's 007
I took this picture of my granddaughter helping in the kitchen.
When I looked at it, I was transported back about 60 years. There I was, standing on a chair in my parents kitchen, following directions from great-grandmother, grand-mother or my own mother. “Cooking”!
Then as my mind moved along the path of years, I could see my children and many nieces, nephews, family friends in my kitchen. All of them doing the same thing.
I don’t think anyone ever went on to become chefs, but we all came away with a basic set of skills and the concept that a kitchen is a great place to share thoughts, give comfort, and learn the blessing of ‘family’.


Fall is here, and that means it is time to make up a supply of tamales to stock the freezer. Hubby and I like them for a quick meal after hunting or hiking around outdoors.
I consider this labor and time intensive so I am glad it makes a good sized batch.
Since a couple of people asked about this, I am sharing
Bertie’s Tamales
This recipe was given to me by my sister in law, who is pretty famous in the family for her excellent tamales.
The recipe makes about 50 tamales. Any leftovers can be frozen and reheated in the microwave still frozen for a minute to a minute and a half.

1 3 lb boneless roast. Most often we use beef, but pork, deer or a combination of meat will work fine.
10 cups water
1 medium onion quartered
3 cloves garlic, minced
Cook this in a heavy pan or crock pot until meat is well done (falls apart) and tender.
If you use the crock pot, low for 6 hours is usually what I use. 2 1/2 -3 hours in a dutch oven seems about right.
Remove meat and allow to cool. Shred with fork, discard any fat.

Strain broth and save 6 cups. You will need to make the masa for the outside of the tamale.

Make red sauce: 2 ounces of dried chili peppers (you are on your own, these come from mild to scorching) I use a mix of anaheim and ancho.
3 cups water
¼ cup finely diced onion
½ tsp dried oregano
cumin, garlic, and salt to taste.

Break off stems and crack chili open, shake out the seeds, rinse well and drain.
Cover chilis with 3 cups water and let set 30 minutes to overnight. Drain.
Now, puree your chilis until they are about the consistency of tomato sauce. Keep smushing them with a spoon until all that is left of the peel is little flecks in the mixture an maybe a few seeds.
Add other ingredients and simmer for 10 minutes.
Mix with the shredded meat and simmer for 30 minutes.
Your meat is ready and can be refrigerated or frozen or if you have the energy left made into tamales now.

For the tamales:
1 bag dried corn husks
6 cups masa harina
1 ½ tsp baking powder
2 tsp salt ( I use less)
¾ cups shortening (Do not try to use cooking oil)

Beat the shortening in a large bowl with mixer until light and fluffy, add masa, salt and baking powder, which you have stirred together alternately with the reserved broth.
Just add enough broth to make a creamy paste!

Soak the corn husks in warm water for 10 minutes, rinse to remove any remaining silk or debris. Drain well.
Assemble Tamales:
Spread 2 T. masa mixture on center of husk (husk should be about 6X8 inches) spread 2 T. filling on top then fold and roll up the husk and secure with toothpick or string.
Get steamer ready. Water does not touch the tamales! Set the basket up on custard cups or whatever, if you don’t have a steamer. I use a metal colander set on three 3 inch high custard cups. Water boiling just below basket, Stand tamales in your steamer. If you have an open end it obviously goes up.
Cover and reduce heat. Steam 40 minutes, adding more boiling water if necessary.