Tag Archive: kids



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Dear Morgan,

This frame holds some of your history.

I will tell you what I can, the quilt blocks were pieced by your great-great-great-grandmother.

She used those cardboard cutouts to make the smaller pieces to sew together by hand as you can see from the one I left upside down. those pieces and the cutout are from a pattern called double wedding ring.

The full block and its pieces are called Dresden Plate.

You might notice your great-great- great grandfather’s name and address on the pattern pieces I included.

The fabric in the back was from her ‘fabric stash’ as quilters call the fabrics saved or purchased for making their treasures.

The red flowers is from an old feed sack, the way many ladies got their fabric. Often they would make a child a dress or shirt and then use the remainder for quilts.

I came by this from someone who had purchased it at an auction and passed it to me. I saved some of the old fabric and blocks, because they are treasures.

Your Great-great grandmother, Bettie, told me they were made by her mother-in-law and asked if I would fix some for you. So here it is, I do hope that you will find it a ‘treasure’ and as you grow up something you will always love.

Mary Shipman

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It might be a good idea to read this past post before you begin the one  for today.

https://oldentimes.wordpress.com/2010/11/19/adventures-with-betty-crocker/

This sort of sets the stage.

Over the years, many young cooks have passed through the kitchen on Sunrise ridge and other places we have called ‘home’ in our journey through life.

Betty Crocker’s red cookbooks for making things and a set of Good measuring cups have been staples of the experience.

This past week, a photo on Facebook of the big red ‘pic cover cookbook was making the rounds. Of course I shared it and many comments came, a good number from those who shared in the making of thing from that book.

My old copy is held together with duct tape, notes in the margins, and many pages smeared with drips. I have a child who wants it and her daughter is now beginning to cook, sometimes here in Sunrise kitchen. Another generation to share with.

While at an auction yesterday, another copy of the book was for sale. The cover was a little worn, the pages inside much like mine.

Yes, I  felt the need to purchase it. Another daughter and granddaughter live in California and they too should have this book.

Now, I need to find a couple more copies for some of the others who ‘graduated’ with the basic cooking certificate here.

I see they are available on Amazon and other outlets, some for quite a price. The ones I need though are well loved, used, smeared (especially on the page with the fudge recipe) and have notes written in them. They may not bee my notes, but I will happily transcribe from mine.

Not much of a ‘legacy’ you might think, but you are wrong. These books are filled with memories and love!

 

 


A new year has begun.

I thought would share a couple of photos that I particularly enjoyed from 2015.

 

eagles

taste testing


After dinner last night, great grandson, Parker, age 3, treated me to a space voyage.
Our seat was in my big armchair, snuggled together, as he piloted our space rocket.
Parkers discourse:
The moon is made of rock and is solid, so you can stand on it.
You have to have your helmet (half a large plastic Easter egg), so you can breathe while you are there.
There is a person inside, but he is not home right now!
Yes, I wore my helmet! I would not have missed this adventure for the world!


Halloween, long ago.

The ‘pack’ of neighborhood kids, dressed in homemade costumes, parading down the streets.

Those kids, waiting for the homemade cookies, caramel apples, real apples, popcorn balls, an occasional candy bar or block of Double Bubble gum.

Laughter, skinned knees, carrying your fussy toddler sibling the last couple of blocks.

No vandals, no chunked pumpkins, no worries, no fears.

What happened?


Grandson and family came by for a visit today.

At near noon, I was still in my PJ’s laying on the futon in the living room.

Three year old great-grandson: “Why so you still have your bejammers on”

Me: “I was sick and had to go to the hospital, I am better, but I have to rest a lot right now.”

Five year old great-granddaughter: “did you get a baby? That’s why mama went to the hospital.”

There are some questions even a grandma can’t come up with answers for.

Enchanted afternoon


Parker, the middle great grandchild decided he wanted to spend the day with Pa and Gamma Grape.

We agreed and entered the wonderful world and imagination of at three year old for several hours.

Our toy box has none of the electronic bells and whistles, so it was not long until I was sitting in the arm chair with him as we drove to the store, inconveniently running out of gas and having a flat on our imaginary adventure. Things that have happened in his world.

Later, after a meal of hot dogs, mac and cheese and pickles, I turned on the computer to share Parker with some family far away.

In the toy box, he found a Spiderman figure, a large two piece Easter egg and some Lego’s. These items became a space ship. He and Pa had a serious discussion over where the ship would go – moon or Mars.

Finally he succumbed to a nap, snuggled on the couch with an afghan and stuffed toy. I might need one too!


Several years back, I did quite a bit of babysitting for family members. It included some ‘Mom, I need some laundry done’ and a parent who worked night shifts.

In order to hang on to some small shreds of sanity, I developed this set of general rules.
We are having lot of guests here, this end of summer time, so I dug out the rules to make sure everyone is on the same page; that page being mine.

RULES

There are other rules enforced, respect for one another, a loose division of labor, (If you can open the bread, get it out and spread peanut butter, you may be on lunch duty.)

It worked quite well before, it will be interesting to see how it works now.


If you read the recent post, “Green beans in a jar”, you know that I had some great help and fun with canning vegetables this summer.
Grandson Erick entered a jar of green beans and one of tomatoes in his local county fair last week.
I proudly add pictures of his blue ribbon winners.
green beans

Erick ribbon


Three gallons of green beans arrived in the kitchen on Sunrise Ridge.
I shanghaied one of he current resident teenagers this morning and demonstrated the fine art of tips, tails and snapping to a more or less willing apprentice. Before long, aid apprentice got the hang of things and we raced through the last half-gallon to see who was faster. 😉
The next part of the lesson involved jar and canner preparation.
While water was heating in the pressure canner, the assistant finished heating beans and getting them properly into the jars.
Soon we had 7 jars of beans in the canner and a respite of time while they cooked.
I regaled my young helper with tales of long ago July days when canning meant keeping the wood stove going, and how glad we were when another was procured and set outside under a big oak tree. There was still a wood fire to feed, but being out where there was a breeze sure beat doing it inside.
Now, I admit, I am pretty sure my helper still has no idea about the wood stove canning and I hope never as to learn how to do that particular thing.
We got the second canner load ready and all finished by 11:30.
That gave us plenty of time to fix dinner and prepare for the second lesson.
We did tomatoes this afternoon, and assistant was pleasantly surprised to find out by dipping the lovely red orbs in boiling water for a few minutes then into ice water, the skins slip right off.
So, now the pantry shelves are filling. A teenager has learned some new things and I have had a very good day. Yes, a very good day!