Tag Archive: Missouri



cedar grove, barns, mennonites, longhorns 033

Barn in Shannon County MO. This is in a Mennonite community.

The one below one was taken in an Amish community near Seymour MO.

I wondered about the projections on top, and did a bit of research. They are called cupolas, put there for added ventilation.

Back when hay was stored in barn lofts, spontaneous combustion was a dire threat to farmers. The cupola helped prevent the buildup of heat in drying hay.

Ladies day 3 Cabool, Seymour, Mansfield EAGLES 054cupola

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Saturday, Hubby, Daughter, grandson and I went to the reenactment of the Battle of Pilot Knob. 150 years have passed since soldiers  from the Grand Army of the Republic faced their counterparts from the Confederate States on this small piece of ground.

We have been there several times before, each time learning something new.

Part of this years program was a presentation by Angela Da Silva. Her program  “Lila: A Missouri Slave’s Story” was fascinating to me. I knew Missouri ha slave holders, but this brought a more personal note than textbooks ever could.

I was talking to my daughter in California about it and we discovered a link to the presentation on youtube.com. http://youtu.be/4x8qMoDUL7I will take you to part one,  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4x8qMoDUL7I part two http://youtu.be/4x8qMoDUL7I and part three  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BykXtQpyCYoare battle of Pilot Knob 150th anni 015Lila Missouri slave


We have been camping. Hubby’s brother and wife joined us for a few days on the Mississippi River in south east Missouri.
We camped near a ferry landing, and were entertained by a number of the folks waiting to make the crossing to Kentucky.
Yesterday afternoon, the ferry had to shut down due to weather. High winds made white cap waves.
This brought about a rather interesting and somewhat sad turn of events.
bikers
This young couple are making a bicycle trip across the United States. They started in California, and are traveling the backroads and smaller highways to reach North Carolina.
They were quite disappointed that the ferry was closed, and asked if we would sell them some bottled water for the 30 mile unplanned leg of the trip to get them to the nearest Mississippi bridge crossing.
Of course we gave them water, at no charge and got out a map to help them find the shortest route.
While we chatt4ed, I mentioned I have a daughter living in California, and another just moved from NC. I asked if they had been on a certain road the day before, and they admitted to having stayed in Ellington MO (our neatest town) and being on that road. Hubby and I had noticed them riding along that road.
I wish I had sent my address and had them send a card when they reach their destination, but I forgot.


Today I sent a selection of knitting needles, collected over the years to a young lady who grew up with my youngest daughter.

I learned to knit, along with a class of other girls when I was 9 or 10, while growing up in Nebraska. My interest lasted about as long as it took to make a hat and scarf, sadly, I did not keep it up, and somewhere along the way that set of needles went the way of many other childhood toys… I am sure my parents gave them to someone who would use them.

About 20 years later, I took it up again, my skills improved and so did my desire to make things. Scarves, hats, and a few baby afghans began to appear. With those increased abilities came the need for more needles, different lengths and sizes and a collection was born.

Over the years, I have purchased some, some came as gifts, one group of needles came while we lived in New Hampshire. Walking down the street , we came upon a home being emptied after a death in the family. There in the bin for trash was a large collection of knitting supplies. The family was happy to ‘donate’ them to another knitter, rather than the local land-fill and I was pleased with the acquisition, too.

Sweaters and slippers were soon added to my repertoire as my stack of patterns grew and I met another knitter there who taught me much and encouraged me.

We moved back to Missouri and so, the needles migrated with us. As the annual Christmases, birthday parties and baby gifts came around with knit gifts, I acquired some more ‘legacy’ needles from one of my sister-in-laws when her mother passed away.

I took an inventory and had them from size 0 to 13, long, short, some double point and some circular. Quite a collection, and truly well-loved.

Then I went to visit my daughter in California and discovered bamboo needles.  Over time all the metal and plastic ones were replaced with bamboo.

What to do with all these needless needles?  When I discovered that this long time friend was knitting, I offered her the needles and she accepted. She has promised to teach someone, hopefully a future daughter in law and pass along to at least a fourth generation some needles with a story.

I hope that happens!


Yesterday, I was out on a field trip with a friend of mine.

We ventured over to Rocky Falls, near Current River,  part of the Ozark National Scenic Riverway. This natural wonder is located a few miles from Highway 106 between Ellington and Eminence Missouri. Take Highway H to Highway N and enjoy the beauty. The hot dry summer had made the falls less pronounced from lack of water, but seeing and hearing it rush over the rocks and down into the still pool below was a nice treat.

We ventured farther up the creek and followed a steep trail up and over the creek branch to the top of the falls. Dampnes and moss made some of the footing a bit slippery. But the view was well worth the hike!

After we reached solid, more stable terrain we drove further along N highway to a fork in the road where the pavement ends. We drove up County Road 422A and came upon Klepzig Mill. At one time this mill had a concrete diversion area for the mill pond, that remains, and a building stands, without the millworks that had once been underneath.