Category: home made



Recently, our family has expanded a bit. Single parent grandson and his children have been staying with us, while he does some serious re-hab on their house.

Having a Head Start student and a Pre-K student around is a challenge. We have had an assortment of the older ones in and out over the years, but no ‘little ones’ on a regular basis.

Of course we are handling it, pretty well. As Hubby says, “We can do this one more time.”

Last week our Pre-K boy needed something that started with the letter N for his ‘Show and Tell’. Uncle Brett and I helped and we soon had lovely noodle necklaces for him to take. 100_0533

I’m re you can see that the finished project made him happy, and he said  everyone in his class liked it too.

While we worked on them, I realized that I did these with my siblings, my own kids, grandkids, various nieces and nephews, and a host of the other children that filtered through out home over the years.

That’s a lot of pasta!

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When our daughter passed away, in 2014, all her craft and quilting supplies were put away. This summer, in an effort to scale down some of the fabric stash and clutter in my craft area, I came upon the boxes and bags filled with her work.

Yes, I grieved again, while trying to decide what should be done with all this. Embroidery, crewel work and quilt blocks. Part of them went into a box to be passed on. I do not do embroidery or crewel work and never will. A disabled friend of a friend does and I know it will be appreciated there.

The quilt blocks and fabric remained, staring at me every time I went in the room. Finally, inspiration struck. I got out some of the blocks and started quilts for each of her three grand children.

I truly worked long and thought hard, since the children are three, four and six years old. Will they understand and cherish them? I do hope so.

But there were other blocks left, a small wall-hanging or lap quilt for each sister? Yes. Those are  in the works. And one for each of her two sons ‘on the drawing board’.

It hurts some to think of trips to buy fabric and all the fun we had in the planning, knowing she never got to see the fruit of this lavor. There are more than a few teardrops on some of the blocks.

Ir’s hard work, but it is bringing me comfort, as I hope it will to the recipients.


Much has been said over the past week about playing the ‘woman card’.

Today’s news showed us the one ostensibly carried by a political candidate. I found it to be lacking, but that is just my humble opinion.

A friend mentioned we all could use one, listing some of the attributes we feel make us who we are. After all, we are lifetime members of the unique guild.

And then, why not a ‘Man Card’ for the rest of the world? Let’s not be guilty of bigotry, all lives matter!

I present mine here: One of my photos and a few words, quite simple.

the woman card

What would your card say?


Today is ‘Autism Awareness Day’.

At our house, like many others, that is every day, not once a year.

As I look back over the past two years since grandson, Brett, has been living with us full time, so many achievements have been made.

Just last week, Brett mentioned that he wants to invite some people over for a spaghetti dinner next Sunday.

This is, in fact several great milestones:

Brett is inviting people (coming out of his shell).

He wants to cook the entire meal himself ( building skills). Last year, for his birthday, a friend sent him a wonderful cookbook. Another sent an apron and chef hat. He uses both. One of his goals has been preparing complete meals for the three of us several times a week.

Last weekend, he made his ‘famous to us’ baked beans for the crowd assembled for out anniversary dinner.

http://www.amazon.com/Picture-Cook-See-Make-Eat/dp/1612432344  is the link for the cookbook.

He has his ‘list’ and a ‘time table’ made (life skills and independence)

And I know, he will do it, and do it well!

 

 


My dad was a genius for homemade costumes, one year my brother was a robot, thanks to some boxes and foil wrap.

I stood out at a long ago Halloween party, done up in a brocade dress of my mothers, some of Gram’s costume jewelry and a cape. For a few hours I was an elegant queen of a far off land.

What could be simpler than a bag of groceries? Back when paper was not an option. a few clever cuts with scissors and some glue to attach empty packages.

I guess with five of us to costume it might have been as much necessity as anything, but we never felt ‘bad’ that we did not have Superman, Cinderella or a witch outfit from the store.

It was a tradition I carried on, an old graduation robe has stood several incarnations, a set of sweats with a bit of judicious trim was a Power Ranger, another with some fabric paint became an articulated skeleton and when the girls were small, every year a clown costume made of flannel also served as winter pajamas.

Life was easier, and far more practical.